If you want to play in water, you will eventually need a snorkel. They can be expensive items though. Of course you can save costs by building your own. Instead of £160 it took under £20 and 2 hours work...bargain or what

First and formost the engines ability to wade was looked at, there are quite a few deep puddles on the estate that we live on and the last thing you want is to go headlong into 5" of water and cover the roof...

We priced up several kits in the £130 - £170 bracket but they seemed well overpriced, I also didn't want to have a snorkel that came through the side of the wing outside the body line as I felt this was vunerable when off road. The green air filter came with the car the other bits cost a whopping £19.

A 70mm holesaw was used to cut the hole...strange that a holesaw to cut a hole...how appropriately named it was, another hole was cut through the bulkhesd under the bonnet, ideal for the 58mm pipework...

The solid plastic pipes were joined to the air filter housing with a length of Landrover elephant trunk air filter hose, ideal for the job and free in the back of my garage, the hose just squeezed round the rear of the battery and was a perfect fit...

This is the finished look, all siliconed together and fixed to the screen pillar, dunno how good the filter will be in the rain so a tractor type filter housing may be sourced at a later date, looks and sounds superb though...

Waterproof the electrics ...

Waterproofing the electrics (coil and distributor) is easy. Get your hands on a set of rubber gloves. Cut the tips off of the fingers, and slip the HT leads going to the distributor through the holes. Cover the distributor with the main section of the glove, and use cable ties around each of the HT leads and distributor base to secure in place. Do the same for the coil. As an added precaution, you could add silicone to ensure a watertight seal.

Article credit ...

Submitted by Caz. You can visit his site and see Cazuki and the original article.

 

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